DNC Leaks Reveal Anti-Sanders Bias with Media and Clinton Camp Colluding

Now it is no secret that Debbie Wasserman Schultz has had the democratic primary process rigged in favor of a Hillary Clinton coronation from the debate schedule, pushing false narratives at the democratic state convention in Nevada, and with her endorsing Hillary Clinton’s campaign in 2008. With WikiLeaks releasing over 20,000 official DNC emails from Guccifer 2.0, there is some damning evidence in some of the emails that shows the system was rigged against Bernie Sanders and that the DNC colluded with the Clinton campaign and media outlets.DNC1

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DNC already preparing a statement on Bernie Sanders dropping out and suspending his campaign in APRIL. He still hasn’t suspended his campaign.

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Debbie Wasserman Schultz wants to contact Phil Griffin, the president of MSNBC to make Mika Brzezinski the co-host of Morning Joe to apologize for saying she should step down because of biases against Bernie Sanders.

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Here we have them openly admitting that her transparency and campaign donors are an issue.

This is only the surface of the emails. Still surfing through them, expect more updates and articles on this.

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How Bernie Sanders’ Revolution Can Live On After the Primaries

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Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders, speaking to over 27,500 people in the Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena at a campaign rally on August 10, 2015. | AP Photo

 

Bernie Sanders has a narrow path towards the Democratic nomination. He needs to win 65% of the remaining pledged delegates up for grabs in order to take the lead in pledged delegates. In superdelegates, he is way behind. Hillary Clinton has 519 superdelegates while Sanders only has 43. Superdelegates do not count until the Democratic Convention in July, but as of right now it doesn’t seem like those superdelegates have any obligation to flip towards Sanders in terms of the pledged delegate race. The only things us Berners can place hope is in an indictment for Hillary Clinton regarding her emails or a huge blowout in California. As of now, both aren’t likely. So as things are looking right now, it appears Hillary Clinton will become the Democratic nominee.

 

Now that I got the doom and gloom out of the way let’s talk about how he can try and maintain his revolution towards this election and onwards. Bernie has impacted this election in many ways. He has pushed Hillary Clinton to the left on the Keystone Pipeline, Trans Pacific Partnership, and the minimum wage. It is doubtful that her stances on those policies will stay because she will promise whatever the electorate wants to hear in attempt to get elected. The most logical answer to this would be to support down ballot candidates in the house and senate who have similar beliefs to Bernie. His campaign has also given campaign money to three down ballot candidates. For more information on down ballot candidates similar to Bernie, visit http://www.grassrootsselect.org/. He has also brought light to several issues on a national stage such as income inequality, breaking up the big banks, legalization of marijuana, a $15 federal minimum wage, abolishing private prisons, and campaign finance reform.

A hard question to answer is what can he do outside of the box to keep ahold of this movement’s energy. What I think Bernie should do is to be on the picket line with unions as he has been. He should organize protests on specific issues. Issues that I think he should continue to push would be climate change, income inequality, and breaking up the big banks. He should filibuster more often. His last filibuster on the continuation of the Bush tax cuts by President Obama which lasted 8 and ½ hours gained him national spotlight. The filibuster sent Obama in a frenzy. It forced former President Bill Clinton to talk to the White House press and tried to sell the public on the tax cuts. He should continue shouting out down ballot candidates and should do so on national television and speeches. Bernie needs to direct this energy towards possibly helping line up a presidential run in 2020 for someone like Alan Grayson, Elizabeth Warren, or Tulsi Gabbard.

The biggest problem with the Occupy Movement was that there wasn’t a leader. We now have one. Bernie will still hold a lot of power beyond these primaries, how he uses it is a whole different story.